Remembering KIPP

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Viewing entries 1 through 10 (Total entries: 14)

Name:
Alan Levine
Comments:
In the early 1970's I worked for Kipp under a work-study program while pursuing my BA in Art when he was the Lehman College Art Department Chairman. Prior my graduation I received a scholarship for a Master of Architecture at an Ivy League University. Unsure of what direction to take and having no one to ask I turned to Kipp who he gave me the "best of advice" of my life to lead a productive career as both an Architect and Artist.

A few years ago I told someone the full story about Kipp and how he was a major influence in life. At that moment I decided contact him over 30 years later. I spoke with him while he was in his nursing home and his rasp loud voice and manner was unchanged! Remembering how he liked cigars I shipped a box of custom hand-made cigar and called him again to make sure he got them. This was the last time I spoke with him to thank for his kind generosity as a person. God Bless Him.
Saturday, November 01 2014 - 04:31 PM
Name:
Maria DeAngelis
Comments:
I had the good fortune to study under Kipp for my MFA at Hunter in the early eighties. as my graduate advisor he led me by asking the tough questions, the path to finding one's own answers. As seriously as he took his charge, he always left lots of room for engaging on a real personal and fun level. While being a mentor, he respected his students as growing artists with their own voices. he held us in respect as such and opened himself to friendships and warm relationships. for that I am eternally grateful. His generosity of spirit will never be forgotten. My sincerest condolences to his family. RIP Kipp, You were truly an icon!
Monday, July 28 2014 - 12:20 PM
Name:
Ellen Gordon
Comments:
My family got to know "Kipp" in 2008 when he was in an Assisted Living facility with my mother. The two of them enjoyed each other's company. Kipp spent several holidays in our home, and we kept in touch by phone until my mother passed away. Thoughts and prayers for the family.
Monday, May 05 2014 - 07:05 AM
Name:
Roy Slade
Comments:
Lyman Kipp was a distinguished sculptor and graduate of Cranbrook Academy of Art. As President of the Academy, I got to know him and his work, visiting him at his home in Florida many years ago. I was delighted that he was included in the 1982 exhibition "CAA USA'", an exhibit of Academy painters and sculptors to celebrate the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Academy. Guest curator Dennis Barrie wrote "For Kipp, an acknowledged leader of the minimalist movement, sculpture is the function of the interaction of simple forms and primary colors".

I was honored to meet him for he was one of Cranbrook's notable graduates and a fine artist. His work and creativity will live on.

Thursday, April 10 2014 - 04:54 PM
Name:
Empire State Plaza Art Collection
Comments:
Since the early 1970s, Lyman Kipp’s colorful steel sculpture, Wild Rice, 1967 has both enlivened the space and subtly echoed the architecture of the Empire State Plaza in Albany, NY. His work is an invaluable part of this important public art collection and will continue to delight and enrich future generations of New Yorkers and visitors from around the world. He will be missed.
Thursday, April 10 2014 - 02:37 PM
Name:
Fred Schaper
Comments:
Kipp was an amazing man and mentor for me, Although I never had the benefit of studying with Kipp, he was one of Icons I grew up hoping to someday become like. I met Kipp in 1986 at a CAA symposium in Indianna, through Jim Sterritt and Terry Slade. Kipp and I instantly became friends and continued a friendship that lasted for years.
Funny how things turn up in our lives, two weeks prior to Kipp passing, I found pictures of my oldest son sitting on Kipp's lap in my living room, looking up to him as an icon. In 1996 Kipp brought us "Red Flag" for a show I was curating, not only was that piece a transitional piece in my work and a favorite since I was a teenager, it was the focal point of our show. Kipp's work brought great credibility to our show and cause.
Kipp did this as a favor to me, we didnt have the budget to provide him with a respectable fee, Kipp did it because he had a great heart, was helping a friend, and it was for the sake of art. Everyone knew the $500 we had for transportation fees didnt cover his travel expenses, one way from Florida to Illinois. Kipp did it for me as a friend, for a member of the system and his love of art.
The week he spent with us was one of the nicest and kindest acts of benevolence I can remember. My biggest regret, is not buying "Red Flag" from him when he offered it to me. My kids were young, we weren't in a position to afford it, but now I regret more than anything not being able to have bought the one sculpture that had made me become what I am and always will be, a sculptor.
We had an "art trade" and many great laughs that week, with his sidekick James Rothberg at the time helping him, we made memories that will last a lifetime and still be telling stories of to my grandchildren (once I have them! ) for years to come. Because of Kipp's generosity and dedication to the Art world, I am.
Kipp had the ability and insight to command presence where ever he was. We affectionately referred to our mentors as "dinosaurs". That was the last thing they all really were. Kipp and the rest of his generation of mentors that taught us all were dedicated visionaries to a movement in art that changed how we view, see and experience art for the rest of the natural world.
Kipp you are and always will be missed in our household, you will be greatly missed as a mentor and friend. His giving of himself, for the world of art he loved and his unique vision, will go on in the memories of those who came to know him. This is a sad moment in the Art world as we have lost one of the true great masters of the 20th century Art world. Take care my friend, we miss you.

Fred Schaper
Wednesday, April 09 2014 - 10:33 AM
Name:
Alan Binstock
Comments:
I studied sculpture under Lyman in the late sixties at Hunter College in the Bronx. Both a teacher and a mentor, he helped me find my aesthetic direction as a sculptor that has stayed with me all these years. Even lately while welding in my studio, images of his first welding lessons pop up. He will be missed and remembered.
Alan Binstock
Tuesday, April 08 2014 - 04:39 PM
Name:
Marie Ringwald
Comments:
Kipp was my teacher at Hunter College in the Bronx where I earned a BFA in sculpture in 1970. He was a wonderful teacher – very much into teaching and encouraging the working process for making things. He was generous with his time and expertise. He guided us to keep looking and studying art. As Chairman of the Art Department he expanded the program and hired working artists who were also inspirations.
I later became a professor at the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington DC, mostly teaching in the Foundations program (Freshmen) and used so much of what I learned in college.
I am and have been very admiring of Kipp’s wonderful work. Most recently I saw his sculpture at Storm King. While I was a student, Kipp’s work was out and about at many outdoor NY City sites as well as in the Museum of Modern Art and NYC galleries.
I think of him often and will always be grateful to him for being in my life at such an important time in my artistic development.
Monday, April 07 2014 - 01:10 PM
Name:
Beau Ott
Comments:
While never having had the opportunity to meet Mr. Kipp in person, I am thankful that I had the chance to express to him in several phone conversations my appreciation for his work. Mr. Kipp's work will continue to live in grand scale in our history books and sculpture parks. Thank you "Kipp"!
Monday, April 07 2014 - 08:05 AM
Name:
Jesse Nolan
Comments:
I worked for Kipp as his assistant in the late 70's, helped him fabricate and install his sculpture for the Winter Olympics in Lake Plaid. I'll remember him as a Wonderful Scoundrel. I'll miss him. Goodbye Kipp!!
Sunday, April 06 2014 - 11:40 PM
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